Giving Is Not Just For The Very Rich - A How-To Guide For Giving & Philanthropy
A. FREE MATERIALS FROM THE BOOK & INTERVIEWS

B. PRESS RELEASE

C. MEDIA and SPEAKING ENGAGEMENTS



FREE MATERIALS FROM THE BOOK & INTERVIEWS:

I How to Evaluate Charities

II How to Avoid Scams

III 8 Ways to Give Back Even If You Have No Money

IV Volunteering:  How to Get Started and Thereby to Enrich Your Life


How to Evaluate Charities – How effective are they?

 Consult  Giving Is Not Just For The Very Rich: A How-to Guide for Giving and Philanthropy  by Dr. Susan Aurelia Gitelson for further guidelines. 

 Once you have probed your own values and passions and considered giving to potential charities, research and scrutinize them to be certain that they are going to maximize your contributions for the designated causes. Fortunately, there are a number of easily accessible websites where you can look up many of the approximately 1.6 million existing charities.Let us first discuss basic considerations for giving wisely.Then we will provide a list of key watchdog groups to scrutinize and evaluate various charities.Finally we will provide references to additional websites for people who really want to dig deeply. 

How to research and evaluate  potential giving opportunities 

A.     Guiding principles for giving wisely .  
1. Find out all you can about the organizations that serve your cause(s) and compare them. What are their goals? programs? results? You can request written information about the charity and their latest annual report, including their mission statement, a list of the Board of Directors, and the most recent audited financial statements. Who is guiding their investments and where are they putting their funds?  
2. Be careful of scams, such as organizations that choose names close to those of genuine charities. Check their websites. Be especially wary in times of crises, e.g., groups after Hurricaine Katrina in 2005 that put Katerina in their domain names to get unsuspecting people to donate to them. 
3. Be certain they are sufficiently transparent about their administration and fundraising expenses. Find out what proportion of the funds they raise goes to actual program services – it should be 65-75% unless it is a new or very small charity with large expenses. Salaries and fundraising costs generally should take up no more than 25%. 
4. Check that they havetax exempt status under section 501(c) (3) of the Internal RevenueCode?Will your contribution be tax deductible, which is not always the same thing? 
5. Do not be pressured into donating. In addition, be careful not to respond immediately to an emotional appeal. You have the right to request written information about the charity and time to think what you wish to do. Be especially wary of phone solicitations by telemarketers who receive a percentage of the money they raise. If you want to give to that group, better to end the conversation and donate directly to the charity on its website so that it will get all the funds.  
6. Keep written records of your donations and expect written receipts from the charity. Do not give your credit card or bank account number over the phone or online unless you are certain about the charity’s identity. 
7. Check if the charity is registered by federal, state and/or local authorities. This ensures that the charities will file financial information with government authorities, although it does not imply government approval of the charity. 
8. Do not feel obligated to send a donation to a charity if it sends you gifts, such as greeting cards, through the mail. You do not have to send a payment for unordered merchandise. The money they ask for goes mainly to cover the cost of the solicitation mailing. In addition, the charity is likely to sell your name to other charities for their fundraising campaigns..9. Check out the results of the charity’s efforts both by asking them and by researching reports about them on the internet, especially through the watchdog agencies. If possible, visit the charity and volunteer your services so that you have a very good idea of what they are actually doing. 
10. Don’t divide your contributions among too wide a variety of organizations. When you are satisfied with your research, concentrate your giving in only a few charities, speak to their leaders and make long-term commitments to them so that you can have maximum impact. As you become a regular supporter, keep scrutinizing the charities to be certain they continue to achieve maximum effectiveness.
 
   Consult  Giving Is Not Just For The Very Rich: A How-to Guide for Giving and Philanthropy  by Dr. Susan Aurelia Gitelson for further guidelines.


II.SCAMS:  How to Avoid Them  

Charity scams – how to spot them, how to stop them, and how to make sure your donations get to those who really need them! 

Charity scams – how to make sure your contributions don’t end up paying for someone else’s deluxe vacation! 

Have you ever been taken in by scams?

Consult  Giving Is Not Just For The Very Rich: A How-to Guide for Giving and Philanthropy  by Dr. Susan Aurelia Gitelson for further guidelines.

 Scams are always lurking after emergencies like 9/11 and Hurricanes Katrina and Sandy. Then there are the con-artists who post pictures of hungry children far away or the semi-celebrities who set up their own "foundations" to battle cancer or other life-threatening diseases. The scams multiply at holiday times when well-intentioned people want to be especially charitable. What can we do to avoid being taken in by scams (although some may slip through despite all our efforts)? 1) Direct your support to well-known, legitimate charities, or to organizations you know and related agencies they recommend. 2) Instead of just following your emotions, take some time to reflect about your priorities for your charitable efforts and to research several organizations in the area that interests you the most to find the one that has the greatest impact. 3) Since bogus charities often adapt names similar to bona fide ones, check out the exact name and leadership of the soliciting charities through the watchdog agencies, such as Charity Navigator (www,charitynavigator.org), GuideStar (www.guidestar,org), and Charting Impact (www,chartingimpact.org).   

Consult  Giving Is Not Just For The Very Rich: A How-to Guide for Giving and Philanthropy  by Dr. Susan Aurelia Gitelson for further guidelines.

   
III  8 WAYS TO GIVE BACK EVEN IF YOU HAVE NO MONEY By “Dr. Susan” Gitelson, “The Giving Doctor”

 Consult  Giving Is Not Just For The Very Rich: A How-to Guide for Giving and Philanthropy  by Dr. Susan Aurelia Gitelson for further guidelines.

What happens if you have no money and no family around you and you are feeling lonely and despondent, can you still give to others? The answer is yes. By doing these 8 things and many more, which means concentrating on others and making them feel better, you will find yourself in a better frame of mind and more able to cope with your problems.

The first step is to look around you and notice which of the people you know are in difficult situations. How can you help them? Can you get together socially to relax? How about talking over some ideas for going out to help others. 

You can volunteer in an old age home to bring cheer to the elderly. 

You can visit sick people in a hospital and help them feel better by conversing with them, telling them stories, and getting them to talk about themselves. 

You can go to a nearby school with disadvantaged children and offer to tutor and mentor them. 

You can visit a neighborhood sports club and offer to teach skills to young people. 

At holiday time, you can get together a group of people and plan a dinner where each of you can contribute one or more dishes. 

Holiday time is also a perfect time to help reputable charities like City Harvest or Citymeals-on-Wheels distribute food to the hungry. 

You can gather your social action network to help displaced people from an emergency, like a storm or fire, recover and find shelter and food to get them by.  At the same time, you want to be careful about scams. Too many people call up and say they have problems and  need your money.  If your funds are scarce, you have to be even more careful than ever to check out the announced charity at Charity Navigator or other evaluation websites. Be wary about sending a check or giving your credit card number. Unfortunately, there are too many con artists who make up charity names similar to real ones and collect money for their own luxuries.  If you help others, but are still careful not to be taken in by con artists, then you will create a sense of well-being and meet desirable people so that you can work out your problems together and cooperate to help each other.

 Consult  Giving Is Not Just For The Very Rich: A How-to Guide for Giving and Philanthropy  by Dr. Susan Aurelia Gitelson for further guidelines.

 
 
IV VOLUNTEERING :  How to get started and thereby to enrich your life!

From Giving Is Not Just For The Very Rich:  A How-to Guide For Giving and Philanthropy 
By Dr. Susan Aurelia Gitelson  
 
Volunteering is so central to the American way of life. It takes concern for others, imagination and perseverance, but not money, so it is the easiest way to give for everyone. Yet something important is required – a lot of thought about how you can be most helpful. First choose the category where you want to help make a difference:  hunger, less advantaged young people, schools, hospitals, emergency situations, animals, the environment, and many more. Next consider the organizations and groups around you that could use your help, such as religious-affiliated organizations, Big Brothers and Big Sisters, neighborhood groups, etc. and find out how you can assist them and how much time and effort it would take. Once you have found activities where you feel you can be really useful, apply your abilities to strengthen programs and help others. 

If you want a broad range of choices, go to www.volunteer.match.org and check out the possibilities by location and institution out of the more than 79,000 nonprofit organizations listed. They have made almost six million referrals since 1998. 

AmeriCorps is a comprehensive government agency offering about 75,000 opportunities for community service on the national and state levels to tutor and mentor disadvantaged youth, fight illiteracy, build affordable housing, clean parks and streams and other services. In addition,it has a special AmeriCorps VISTA program to provide full-time capacity-builders to bring low-income individual and communities out of poverty. The AmeriCorps National Civilian Community Corps (NCCC ) is designed especially for full-time people ages 18-24 to strengthen communities while developing leaders. Full-time young people who complete their service receive education awards to help pay college and graduate school expenses and some AmeriCorps members may receive a modest living allowance while they are serving.(www.americorps.gov

The HandsOn Network is the largest American volunteer structure with more than 70,000 corporate, faith and nonprofit organization programs to enlist volunteer service. As part of theiroutreach efforts, they provide AmeriCorps Alums with more than 120,000 experienced volunteer leaders committed to lifelong improvement of their communities.(www.handsonnetwork.org
Among the outstanding volunteer organizations is Big Brothers Big Sisters has been supporting mentoring services for more than 100 years to “provide children facing adversity with strong and enduring, professionally supported one-to-one relationships that change their lives for the better, forever.”   (www.bbbs.org

With all these choices, what are you waiting for? 

Consult  Giving Is Not Just For The Very Rich: A How-to Guide for Giving and Philanthropy  by Dr. Susan Aurelia Gitelson for further guidelines.
 





PRESS RELEASE:
 
 
Guide highlights meaningful giving to benefit others, yourself
 
 
Dr. Susan Aurelia Gitelson provides essential information on how to become an innovative giver to causes close to your heart in “Giving Is Not Just For The Very Rich:  A How-to  Guide for Giving and Philanthropy”
 
 
Foreword by Hon. Robert M. Morgenthau
 
 
NEW YORK – Dr. Susan Aurelia Gitelson answers many questions about the reasons to give and how to give wisely in “Giving Is Not Just For The Very Rich: A How-to Guide for Giving and Philanthropy” (ISBN 1468111043). Gitelson says her book will help readers clarify their priorities, choose charitable organizations wisely and become aware of how to make a real impact. From baby boomers to young entrepreneurs, there are numerous practical ideas for giving back, which not only help others, but also allow donors to feel better about themselves.
 
 
Gitelson gives examples of the wealthiest donors who act as pacesetters, but then goes on to consider other ways for everyone to give time, ideas and assets to help others. She offers examples of innovative givers, social entrepreneurs, celebrities, government officials, nonprofit professionals, volunteers and social media networkers who also have a positive impact on society. Analyzing the major areas for giving, she reviews religious philanthropy, education K-12, higher education, science and health, arts, culture and humanities, sports, multipurpose umbrella organizations, awards and international aid.
 
 
“I want my readers to use this book as a source about giving creatively to help others,” Gitelson says. “The examples offered can inspire the reader to devise meaningful, innovative contributions. It belongs in everyone’s library for reference and for very practical ways to evaluate soliciting charities.”
 
 
“Giving Is Not Just for The Very Rich:  A How-to Guide for Giving and Philanthropy”  is available for sale online at Amazon.com and other channels in both print (paperback) and electronic editions..
 
 
About the Author:
Dr. Susan Aurelia Gitelson has a bachelor’s from Barnard College and her master’s and doctorate from Columbia University. She has been president of International Consultants, Inc. and consults for international business, educational, cultural and other institutions. Gitelson previously was the co-chair of the Dean’s Council for the Columbia School of International and Public Affairs. She currently serves as a member of the board of advisers of the National Committee on American Foreign Policy. She has had books and articles published on four continents and was awarded Columbia University’s prestigious medal for distinguished alumni service. She is listed in Who’s Who in America and Who’s Who in the World.
 
 
MEDIA CONTACT
Dr. Susan Aurelia Gitelson
Email:               susangitelson72@gmail.com
Phone:              (212) 794-2852
 
MEDIA INTERVIEWS: 

Frankie Boyer (Boston, MA), Paul Berry (Washington, DC), Bob Cudmore (New York State), Chris DeBello (NJ), Dan Del Campo (CA), Michael Dresser (Milwaukee, WI), Dr. Stan Frager (Louisville, KY), Bonnie D. Graham (Great Neck, NY), Rich Hallstrom & Zeke Bambolo (Seattle, WA), Brad Segall (Philadelphia, PA), Chickee Fitzgerald, “Uncommon Giving” (FL), and many more.

 
SPEAKING ENGAGEMENTS:
 
COLUMBIA ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 12/12/12 
 
Readings & Literature
 
December 12, 2012 
 
Wednesday 6:00 PM to 8:00 PM
 
 
Join alumni and staff in the Alumni Welcome Center for guest speaker Susan Gitelson '63BC '66SIPA '70GSAS, the author of Giving Is Not Just For The Very Rich: A Guide for Giving and Philanthropy (2012) for a discussion about ideas to reap the benefits of giving, how to clarify priorities, and choose charitable organizations wisely.
An intimate reception to follow.
 
Artist's Bio:
Susan Gitelson | '63BC '66SIPA '70GSAS

Dr. Susan Aurelia Gitelson has been President of International Consultants, Inc. and has been consulting for international business, educational, cultural and other institutions. Dr. Gitelson has been Co-Chair of the Dean’s Council of the Columbia School of International and Public Affairs (SIPA). She was also a National Vice President of the American Friends of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and remains a member of the International Board of Governors of the Hebrew University and the Board of the Harry S. Truman Research Institute on the Advancement of Peace at the Hebrew University. In addition, she is a member of the Board of Advisers of the National Committee on American Foreign Policy. Currently she is also a member of the Board of Overseers of the Museum of Jewish Heritage/A Living Memorial to the Holocaust. Previously she had been on the advisory boards of the Ralph Bunche Institute for International Studies at the City University Graduate Center and the Center for the Study of the Presidency. In addition, she has supported the Columbia SIPA Gitelson Policy Forum, the Gitelson Peace Publications of the Truman Institute, and many other programs and awards at Columbia University, the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, the City University Graduate Center, the Center for the Study of the Presidency and other institutions. Her books and articles have been published on four continents. Columbia University awarded her its prestigious Alumni Medal for Distinguished Service. Dr. Gitelson received her B.A. from Barnard College and her M.I.A. and Ph.D. from Columbia University. She was a trainee at the Rockefeller Foundation. In addition, she was an assistant professor of international relations at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Subsequently she headed several small international business firms for many years, where she used her earned income to sponsor cultural and educational programs. She is the author of Giving is Not Just For The Very Rich: A How-to Guide for Giving and Philanthropy, and Multilateral Aid for National Development and Self-Reliance. In addition, she co-edited Israel in the Third World with Michael Curtis. Dr. Gitelson is listed in Who’s Who in America, Who’s Who in the World, Who’s Who in Finance and Business, and other biographical directories. 
 
 
ROTARY CLUB OF NY
 
 
EventEvening Mtg: Susan GitelsonDateMar 11, 2013 at 06:00 PM - 07:30 PMFee$50.00LocationThe Harvard Club New York, NY 10036 

DetailsAn Evening of Camaraderie & Networking
Come join your fellow Rotarians in an evening of social networking, wine and hors d'oeuvres! Catch up with your friends and meet some new ones. 
Our Mar 11 meeting will be at the Harvard Club from 6 - 7:30 pm. with featured speaker Dr. Susan Gitelson

“Giving Is Not Just For The Very Rich: A How-to Guide for Giving and Philanthropy” - Foreword by Hon. Robert M. Morgenthau 

Dr. Susan Aurelia Gitelson answers many questions about the reasons to give and how to give wisely in “Giving Is Not Just For The Very Rich: A How-to Guide for Giving and Philanthropy” (ISBN 1468111043). Gitelson says her book will help readers clarify their priorities, choose charitable organizations wisely and become aware of how to make a real impact. From baby boomers to young entrepreneurs, there are numerous practical ideas for giving back, which not only help others, but also allow donors to feel better about themselves. 

Gitelson gives examples of the wealthiest donors who act as pacesetters, but then goes on to consider other ways for everyone to give time, ideas and assets to help others. She offers examples of innovative givers, social entrepreneurs, celebrities, government officials, nonprofit professionals, volunteers and social media networkers who also have a positive impact on society. Analyzing the major areas for giving, she reviews religious philanthropy, education K-12, higher education, science and health, arts, culture and humanities, sports, multipurpose umbrella organizations, awards and international aid. 

“I want my readers to use this book as a source about giving creatively to help others,” Gitelson says. “The examples offered can inspire the reader to devise meaningful, innovative contributions. It belongs in everyone’s library for reference and for very practical ways to evaluate soliciting charities.” 
About Dr. Gitelson 

Dr. Susan Aurelia Gitelson has a bachelor’s from Barnard College and her master’s and doctorate from Columbia University. She has been president of International Consultants, Inc. and consults for international business, educational, cultural and other institutions. Gitelson previously was the co-chair of the Dean’s Council for the Columbia School of International and Public Affairs. She currently serves as a member of the board of advisers of the National Committee on American Foreign Policy. She has had books and articles published on four continents and was awarded Columbia University’s prestigious medal for distinguished alumni service. She is listed in Who’s Who in America and Who’s Who in the World. 
 
 
Sutton Place Synagogue Dinner and Talk  
 
Friday, November 16, 2012 SHABBAT DINNER & TALK
Kabbalat Shabbat Service Led by Rabbi Rachel Ain & Cantor Dov Keren
begins at 6:15 PM *
 
Dinner & Talk FollowsGuest Speaker: DR. SUSAN AURELIA GITELSON
author of the how-to guide on philanthropy: Giving Is Not Just For The Very Rich
 
Dr. Gitelson is an involved longtime member of SPS. She has been awarding the SPS Gitelson-Meyerowitz Distinguished Service Award for more than 20 years to outstanding Jewish leaders.

Dr. Gitelson received her B. A. from Barnard College and her M.I.A. and Ph.D. from Columbia University. She was a trainee at the Rockefeller Foundation and an assistant professor of international relations at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. After her fortunate meeting with Jerry Meyerowitz at SPS, he invited her to join him in business. Following his death in 1991, she headed several small international business firms. Her great pleasure has been to use her profits to sponsor cultural and educational programs at Columbia University, the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, SPS, and other major institutions.   Dinner & Talk: $36 per person
(includes signed copy of Giving Is Not Just for the Very Rich)
Advance dinner reservation required: 212-593-3300 or email sps@spsnyc.org. Sutton Place Synagogue | 225 East 51st Street | New York | NY | 10022  

 

Consult  Giving Is Not Just For The Very Rich: A How-to Guide for Giving and Philanthropy  by Dr. Susan Aurelia Gitelson for further guidelines.
 
 


 
 

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